Monday, November 25, 2013

Iran Nuclear Deal, Concern Expressed From Both Sides Of the Aisle...

by: Les Carpenter
Rational Nation USA
Liberty -vs- Tyranny


With many lawmakers wary over the Iran nuclear deal its looks like the right and the left may have rediscovered bipartisanship



Top lawmakers on both side of the aisle on Sunday voiced skepticism about the newly struck agreement with Iran, and vowed to keep up the pressure with sanctions.

Senior members in both chambers said that, at first glance, Iran got the better end of the deal with western powers, China and Russia – effectively exchanging looser sanctions for very little progress in impeding Tehran’s nuclear capabilities.

Some powerful lawmakers have said they’re willing to seek new sanctions now, but delay their implementation until after the six months covered by the current deal. But others weren’t even willing to go that far.

Sen. Chuck Schumer (N.Y.), the No. 3 Democrat in the chamber, called the deal disproportionately good for Iran, and that it was only strong sanctions that gave the United States and its allies any leverage over Tehran.

“This disproportionality of this agreement makes it more likely that Democrats and Republicans will join together and pass additional sanctions when we return in December,” Schumer said in a Sunday statement.

In fact, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s office pointed out Sunday that the Virginia Republican and Schumer – rarely allies on any issue – had sounded similar concerns about the deal, and the impact sanctions have had on Iran.

President Obama and top members of his administration, like Secretary of State John Kerry, have stressed that the pressure has been successful – but that pressing ahead with further sanctions could “derail” the new deal.

House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) are among the lawmakers to say they’d be open to putting sanctions in place for six months down the line.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) had vowed last week to move ahead with sanctions legislation, but has yet to comment on the agreement finalized this weekend in Geneva.

Menendez added Sunday that he expected any Senate deal on sanctions to allow the U.S. to immediately restart sanctions if Iran fails to live up to its part of the deal.

“Given Iran's history of duplicity, it will demand ongoing, on-the-ground verification,” Menendez said. “Until Iran has verifiably terminated its illicit nuclear program, we should vigorously enforce existing sanctions.”

“Given Iran's history of duplicity, it will demand ongoing, on-the-ground verification,” Menendez said. “Until Iran has verifiably terminated its illicit nuclear program, we should vigorously enforce existing sanctions.”

Under the deal announced Sunday, the U.S. and its allies will loosen temporarily loosen sanctions on Iran’s sale of crude oil, its automotive sector and other parts of the economy.

Iran, on the other hand, agreed to tougher outside inspections and to cap its nuclear stockpile. Tehran will also halt work at a heavy water reactor at its Arak site and suspend the installation of new centrifuges. The two sides disagree on whether the agreement allows Iran to enrich its uranium, and whether it takes any military action against the country off the table.

The initial agreement does not cover the construction of new centrifuges or the reversal of progress Iran has made in its nuclear program. {Read More}

I like the idea of developing additional sanctions now to be used only if Iran over the next six months fails to conduct itself in accordance with "the deal."

Via: Memeorandum

9 comments:

  1. Quite a history of bad blood has steered the foreign policy of both countries.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Iran has a long painful history of foreign control over it's resources and power. Poking them with potential future sanctions (as if we can't just do it if the time comes) is just being a douche bag as far as they're concerned, and really just acting like douche bags period. It's Dick Cheney-ish, which means, by definition, acting like a douche bag. We've lessened the sanctions, a little, for 6 months. Let's see what they do with it. If they mess it up, then back to the sanctions we go, or worse. But in the meantime, nothing good will come from acting like douche bags.

    And remember, oil companies and the MIC have a lot to gain from trouble with the Iranians. There are plenty of people out there willing to see people suffer and die for a buck.

    JMJ

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey jmj, ya really like the sound of douche bag(s) don't you?

    Did you read the closing sentence of the post? I'm going to go out on a limb and bet the answer is no.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Uh, Les, I got that. That wasn't directed at you.

      JMJ

      Delete
  4. Schumer is exceedingly pro-Israel and so it doesn't surprise me one iota that he's opposed to this thing. Ditto with a lot of the other Dems as well.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The lessening of the sanctions allows lots of people to make money, but does nothing to prevent Iran from creating nuclear weapons (it might actually accelerate the process). A crappy one sided deal is a crappy one sided deal. There will be no new sanctions in the future because too many people benefit from the lifting.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Interesting that Iranian students are sent here for education.
    Ms. Pasebani is working on her PhD in Materials Engineering and has worked with the Idaho National
    Engineering Lab on nuclear materials. She did her undergrad work in her hometown of Tehran.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Iran will have nuclear weapons (if it already doesn't), but the real trick is making them small enough to put on the tip of a missile. I am sure that they have enough material already to make crude bombs, but they need time and materials to perfect the miniature versions.

    ReplyDelete
  8. The only reasonable reaction IMO is a "wait and see" attitude. This is a 6-month deal. Let it play out before it's pronounced a failure.

    ReplyDelete

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