Wednesday, October 20, 2021

January 6 investigation: Republican leadership instructs members to vote 'no' on criminal contempt charge for Steve Bannon

 


We break from our normal postings to bring the latest news on the Trump/Bannon conspiracy to overthrow oir democratic republic and install Trump illegally as president following the free and fair election of 2020.



Co-conspirators - January 6, 2020

The extreme narcissism and anti democracy beliefs of the two authoritarians above (obviously shared my millions of Americans) MUST be eradicated from our body politic or this nation WILL cease to exist as we've known it. 

Just as totalitarian Communist China invaded and took control of sovereign Tibet in 1959 so too will America authoritarian's (Trump, Bannon, McConnell, and the present GOP) work to bastardize our constitution and the rule of law, it has already begun, 

Left to their plan and devices they WILL turn this nation into and a plutocracy with the billionaires ruling the land. THEIR OWN SELFISH SELF INTERESTS IS ALL THAT WILL HOLD THEIR ATTENTION.

Click on THIS LINK for much more.


Tuesday, October 19, 2021

THE DALAL LAMA'S 2021 GLOBAL VISION SUMMIT HAS BEEN MADE AVAILABLE UNTIL OCTOBER 20th - ALL SESSIONS FREE


GREAT NEWS!! IF YOU MISSED ANY OF HIS HOLINESS THE DALAI  LAMA'S GLOBAL VISION SUMMIT FREE ACCESS FOR ALL SESSIONS IS NOW AVAILABLE UNTIL 4:00PM EST OCTOBER 20, 2021


EXTENDED FREE ACCESS!

Watch all sessions from the past 5 days
free until Oct 20 at 4:00 pm EST.

Wow – The Power of Compassion has been a tremendous success! Over 65,000 people signed up to be part of this remarkable gathering. With so many extraordinary presentations and guided practices packed into the past five days, we want to give everyone more time to take it all in.

We're offering a free encore replay of all sessions – you can watch anything you might have missed, or want to revisit, for free until 4:00 pm Eastern Time (North American time zone). Click here to watch now.

Over the past five days, presenters have:
 Underscored our deep interconnectedness, and the vital role compassion plays in our collective well being

 Shared deeply insightful practice methods for making positive changes in our daily lives

 Shown us what is needed to build more harmonious, inclusive, just, and compassionate communities
And much more.
We are delighted to extend free viewing of all 30+ sessions so that you can explore the power of compassion from these remarkable presentations.

If you wish to explore these teachings deeper with lifetime access, you can upgrade to own the resource package.

We hope you have enjoyed The Power of Compassion – it's been an honor to host this special event with Tibet House US, and we express our deepest gratitude to all presenters who shared their wisdom over the past 5 days.
WATCH ENCORE
P.S. Special event pricing ends soon!

It's not too late to save $132 on the Resource Package, with lifetime access to all summit content + special bonus resources.
When you upgrade you'll receive lifetime access to all the videos, transcripts, and audio of every summit session, all the guided practices, plus these 6 special bonus resources:
 

 Compassion & Loving-Kindness Meditations (6-part audio series by Lion's Roar)

 Teachings on Compassion by the Dalai Lama (audio courtesy of Shambhala Publications)

 The Vision of the Dalai Lama: Wisdom for a Compassionate World (Lion's Roar special digital publication)

 Mission: Joy, 2021 Film

 Excerpt from Peak Mind, the new book by acclaimed neuroscientist Amishi Jha


Right now, you can purchase the Summit Resource Package at a special event price with savings of $132 until Oct 21, 2021.
 
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The Buddha's Eightfold Path and Meditation


To understand how to practice mindfulness in daily life, says Gaylon Ferguson, we have to look at all eight steps of the Buddha’s noble eightfold pat

 In his first teaching at Deer Park, the Buddha praised mindfulness: “The Noble Eightfold Path is nourished by living mindfully.”

From the beginning, the path of awakening includes all aspects of our human lives: physical, emotional, mental, spiritual, and social. The aim is a mindful life. This means that our relationship to our sexuality and our consumerist economic system, our parenting, and our politics are all part of the path.

This approach to living fully is outlined in the eightfold path. “Right mindfulness” is one aspect of this path, alongside right view, right intention, right effort, right meditative engagement, right speech, right livelihood, and right action. The Sanskrit word samyak—often translated as “right” or “perfect”—can also mean “complete.” Engaging mindfulness encourages complete engagement with life.

Let’s walk through these aspects of the Buddhist spiritual path, returning mindfulness to her rightful place among her seven less famous but equally important sisters and brothers.

Right View

The central view of the Buddha’s teaching is a middle way, avoiding the extremes of aggressive asceticism (being harsh with ourselves and others) and laissez-faire indulgence (spiritual laziness). We approach all our experience with basic friendliness and respect. In the context of meditation practice, this means gently placing awareness on our bodies and minds in a “not too tight, not too loose” manner. Without this view of fundamental loving-kindness, there is no mindfulness meditation. Practicing mindfulness as mere mental gymnastics leaves us feeling even more depleted.

Experience is the heart of the matter, but we need first to understand what we are doing, why we are doing it, and how mindfulness relates to the rest of our lives.

In a culture where “Just do it” now has the well-worn familiarity of a mantra, jumping into mindfulness practice without first contemplating the view seems an attractive option. Why study the classic teachings on meditation when the main point is to practice? Isn’t the whole point not to think too much about it? But the Buddha wisely suggested study and contemplation as supports to any practice. Yes, experience is the heart of the matter, but we need first to understand what we are doing, why we are doing it, and how mindfulness relates to the rest of our lives.

Right Intention

Why are we engaging in mindfulness? Contemplating our intention at the beginning of a session rouses our motivation. Our aim may be calmness or peace, stability or a more compassionate heart, or all of the above. The point is that we have already entered the session with some sense of purpose or direction. Take a moment for self-reflection and nonjudgmental self-awareness before rushing on. This gesture of self-respect can gently cut some of the momentum of our accumulated neurotic speed.

Acknowledging the motivation we already have can be the first step in an expanding journey. The stress and anxiety we sometimes feel are surely shared by others around us—in our families, our workplaces, our communities. Including a sense of practicing for their well-being and liberation is called “the great motivation.” We are walking a path of awakening that includes being generous and caring, patient and helpful. This expansiveness of intention brings spaciousness and warmth to our sitting practice, allowing those heartfelt qualities to pervade our daily living with others.

Why are we engaging in mindfulness? Contemplating our intention at the beginning of a session rouses our motivation. Our aim may be calmness or peace, stability or a more compassionate heart, or all of the above. The point is that we have already entered the session with some sense of purpose or direction. Take a moment for self-reflection and nonjudgmental self-awareness before rushing on. This gesture of self-respect can gently cut some of the momentum of our accumulated neurotic speed.

Acknowledging the motivation we already have can be the first step in an expanding journey. The stress and anxiety we sometimes feel are surely shared by others around us—in our families, our workplaces, our communities. Including a sense of practicing for their well-being and liberation is called “the great motivation.” We are walking a path of awakening that includes being generous and caring, patient and helpful. This expansiveness of intention brings spaciousness and warmth to our sitting practice, allowing those heartfelt qualities to pervade our daily living with others.

Right Effort

Effort also has an associated slogan in contemporary culture: “No pain, no gain.” If we don’t try and try again and try harder, we are told, no result can be attained.

This can lead to a one-sided approach to exertion, as though the Buddha’s meditation instruction was to place the attention “not too loosely, not too loosely.” We can find ourselves practicing with hypervigilance, eager participants in a new spiritual sport called Extreme Effort. Meditators can develop a habitual tightness instead of cultivating the relaxed spaciousness of heart and mind that originally inspired us toward awakening.

My first Buddhist meditation teacher, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, spoke of non-effort as a worthy partner to effort: “Effort, non-effort and effort, non-effort—it’s beautiful.”

Mindfulness is an innate capacity, present in all sentient beings.

Yes, it is important to apply ourselves, to engage fully in mindful living. But it is equally important to release all trying and confidently trust our innate mindfulness to shine through. All the Buddhist traditions of natural wakefulness, original goodness, or buddhanature are based on this sense of inborn wisdom not produced by meditating or walking the path. This is the practice of basic sanity through what is called “just sitting” or “non-meditation” or “primordial great perfection.” As the pioneering Zen master Shunryu Suzuki Roshi phrased it: “The point we emphasize is strong confidence in our original nature.”

In this view, mindfulness is not a special attainment or an extraordinary event in our life journey. Mindfulness is an innate capacity, present in all sentient beings. Walking the path, we are gently cultivating our own nature, allowing seeds of potential to blossom. From this perspective, awakening is as natural as the dawning of the sun. We are invited to begin each session by feeling this naturally awake quality—and to return to this original openness again and again during practice and everyday life.

Right Meditative Engagement

Sanskrit word samadhi is often translated as “meditative absorption,” but this can suggest being so absorbed in something (such as a favorite piece of music) that we are oblivious to everything around us.

If we engage our bodies and minds and breathing and emotions fully in mindfulness practice, on the other hand, that same quality of spacious connection can continue as we rise from meditation. Mindfulness goes hand in hand with noticing the environment around our body, around our breathing, around our thoughts and emotions. We listen to what our partner is saying rather than mentally replay the tense moments from our day at work. We notice the swaying of the trees in the wind, just as we notice the movement of our legs in walking meditation. Same directness, same inclusiveness.

Please continue reading BELOW the FOLD.

Thich Nhat Hanh 95th Birthday - Update

 



In recognition of Thich Nhat Hanh’s 95th birthday on October 9, Plum Village released a statement sharing updates about his health and wellbeing over the past year.

According to the statement, Thich Nhat Hanh has experienced increasing weakness over the past year, with special difficulty with his lungs and overall health during wet seasons. His difficulties are exacerbated during heavy rains in Spring and Autumn, which limit his capacity to go outside. The statement reported:

“In recent months, Thầy has been resting for most of the day with his eyes closed, yet he is often very alert, present and at peace. When the weather is fine, the attendants help Thầy to go out onto the veranda of the Deep Listening Hut to enjoy the sun. The pandemic has meant that this past year has above all been a year for the young monastics in Huế to spend time with Thầy in a very quiet yet joyful atmosphere, with many new young disciples taking turns to assist the attendant team.”

The statement from Plum Village also included some other updates from the community, including the release of Thich Nhat Hanh’s latest book, Zen and the Art of Saving the Planet, which addresses how to collectively combat global climate change. The post also included information on how to virtually participate in the Plum Village community, including through their annual 90-day Rains Retreat, and the Plum Village App which offers free meditations, practices, and other resources from Thich Nhat Hanh and his monastic community.

SOURCE: Lion's Roar