Friday, March 6, 2015

Republicans and a Missed Opportunity...

Rational Nation USA
Purveyor of Truth



Whether the republican party and its leadership want to recognize it or not they have a perception problem. A major one. Especially among minority groups and in this particular instance the African-American community.

With the 50th anniversary of the signing of the 1965 Voting Rights Act approaching and with commemorative activities scheduled in Selma, Alabama, not a single member of the republican congressional leadership is attending. For a party that claims it is inclusive and has a large tent to willfully ignoring the significance of 1965 is, to say the least, foolish. But I guess the message that will be received by a majority of African-Americans is lost on them.

Insensitivity to issues of this importance and magnitude is precisely why the party of Lincoln is unable to effectively grow its ranks. Sincerity gains results, empty talk flies like the wind. Either republicans are tone deaf or they simply do not care. There exists a great probability the latter is the prevailing perception.

Another lost opportunity for republicans to do the right thing. It certainly has been a pattern of late. A pattern who's driving force is all too painfully obvious.

From Politico.

Scores of U.S. lawmakers are converging on tiny Selma, Alabama, for a large commemoration of a civil rights anniversary. But their ranks don’t include a single member of House Republican leadership — a point that isn’t lost on congressional black leaders.

None of the top leaders — House Speaker John Boehner, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy or Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was once thought likely to attend to atone for reports that he once spoke before a white supremacist group — will be in Selma for the three-day event that commemorates the 1965 march and the violence that protesters faced at the hands of white police officers. A number of rank-and-file Republicans have been aggressively lobbying their colleagues to attend, and several black lawmakers concurred.

“It is very disappointing that not a single Republican leader sees the value in participating in this 50th commemoration of the signing of the Voting Rights Act. I had hoped that some of the leadership would attend, but apparently none of them will,” said Congressional Black Caucus Chairman G.K. Butterfield of North Carolina. “The Republicans always talk about trying to change their brand and be more appealing to minority folks and be in touch with the interests of African-Americans. This is very disappointing.”

Former CBC Chair Marsha Fudge (D-Ohio) agreed.

“Not only do they have an opportunity to participate in something that is historic in this country, but certainly they’ve lost an opportunity to show the American people that they care,” she said. “Their loss.”

Black leaders in Congress pressured Scalise to attend the Faith and Politics Institute event after news reports revealed that the Louisiana Republican gave a speech to a group connected with Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke when Scalise was still serving in the state Legislature. Scalise said late last month that a scheduling conflict would keep him from Selma this year but that he hoped to attend in 2016.

McCarthy has attended in the past but won’t make the trip this year. Senate Majority Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) will also miss the event.

Still, a number of rank-and-file Republicans are attending. Sen. Tim Scott, a South Carolina Republican, is a co-sponsor of the event along with Rep. Martha Roby of Alabama. Scott is the first African-American Republican elected from the South since the end of Reconstruction.

Roby’s office said Thursday 23 Republican House and Senate members are registered to attend the pilgrimage.

9% of republican members of Congress are planning on being in attendance. It's something anyway.

Read more BELOW THE FOLD>.

Via: Memeorandum

8 comments:

  1. Les... half the battle is showing up. What message is this sending to millions of people who now have the right to vote because a bi-partisan majority of leaders in the 60"s chose to do the right thing and act together?

    I've often said that there are many people in minority communities who lean conservative, but who will never consider the GOP because of the way they are treated.

    It isn't about free stuff, as many conservatives claim. The simple truth is people will not choose to associate with people that make fun of them, and make it known that they are not wanted.

    Now I know the same argument could be made to explain why the GOP leadership is skipping Selma, but that is different. Those are elected officials. People elected to serve ALL the people.

    You are 100% right... this is a missed opportunity.

    ReplyDelete
  2. For the life of me Dave I cannot understand the apparently myopic view conservatives today seem to have. One can be a fiscally responsible conservative and believe strongly in individualism, personal responsibility, hard work, and all that without being blind to the soft side of politics and governance.

    I had high hopes for the Tea Party when the "movement" first hit the ground. After observing the behaviors of many who identify as Tea Party members or advocates I have arrived at the realization the movement (which includes the so-con faction) is perhaps the greatest threat to liberty we have seen in many tears.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Les... looks like finally, someone from the House Leadership team has decided to attend. There's been some interesting chatter on one of the blogs some of us read denigrating Obama for attending asking if he was white, would he attend? Maybe they are unaware of GW Bush attending.

    That particular blog even mused that his going was going inflame racial tensions.

    How can they possibly hope to win future elections, in a country that is marching ever closer to the 50% mark of minority residents, with these attitudes?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are delusional?

      Seriously Dave, republicans will have an increasingly more difficult time winning the presidency unless the party is seen as relevent to minorities as well as white folks.

      Republican Party's biggest problem is while it may talk inclusion it doesn't walk the talk. It is merely superficial and most of the folks the party will need to win future presidental elections know it.

      Unless the party changes on significant ways it could eventually go the way of the old Whig party.

      Delete
  4. "not a single member of the republican congressional leadership is attending." Hmmm, they sure showed up for Netanyahu...and he doesn't even vote.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Bibi is the new hero of the neo con all war all the time right wing MIC advocates. They see it as their mission to create a world in their own image.

    Frightening...

    ReplyDelete
  6. War keeps people frightened. Frightened people are easier to control and are more willing to give up their freedom and privacy for supposed security.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Indeed Jerry. Ole Ben Franklin knew this way back when. And to think all those republican patriots not getting it.

    Go figure.

    ReplyDelete

As this site encourages free speech and expression any and all honest political commentary is acceptable. Comments with cursing or vulgar language will not be posted.

Effective 8/12/13 Anonymous commenting has been disabled. This unfortunate action was made necessary due to the volume of Anonymous comments that are either off topic or serve only to disrupt honest discourse..

I apologizes for any inconvenience this necessary action may cause the honest Anonymous who would comment here, respect proper decorum and leave comments of value. However, The multitude of trollish attack comments from both the left and right has necessitated this action.

Thank you for your understanding... The management.